Square Foot Gardening

Learn How To Garden In Small Gardens

Improve Your Organic Gardening Skills By Trying These Ideas

 

Organic fruits and vegetables are both delicious and healthy, far surpassing normal supermarket produce. Rather than eating store-bought fruits and veggies, you should try growing your own. Keep reading to learn how you can construct an organic garden of your own right in your house.

To keep your houseplants happy during the day, your thermostat should be set anywhere between 65 and 75 degrees. Plants need to be in an environment that is neither too warm nor too cool for them to grow. If you aren’t wanting your house to be this warm in the winter, you can use a heat lamp on the plants.

You should work efficiently, instead of working hard in your garden, to simplify things. It’s frustrating to search for a tool for a half hour. Take the time to prepare the necessary tools, and then store them in a easily accessed place once you are done gardening. Invest in a tool belt or wear pants that have lots of pockets.

Pine Needles

Pine is a mulch that is great. Some garden plants are high in acidity, and do better with acidic soil. For such plants, pine needles function both as a handy mulch and as a soil amendment to lower the pH. Sprinkle the pine needles over your beds. As the needles decompose, they add to the acid level in the soil.

Use a laundry basket to help you collect produce from your garden. The laundry basket is a perfect strainer for any produce run off. Rinse your produce while it lays in the basket; any excess water strains off through the laundry basket holes.

Within your composting heap, ensure that there is an equal split of dried and green plant materials. Add grass clippings, waste from fruits and vegetables, leaves, and weeds for the green materials in your compost pile. Examples of dried plant material are sawdust, shredded paper, straw, cut-up woody material, and cardboard. Your compost pile should never contain meat, ashes or charcoal.

Lightly ruffle your seeds by hand or with cardboard, twice daily in your organic garden. That may sound like a silly thing to do, but it’s been proven to help plants grow larger than they would otherwise.

 

Creating a trap with beer can help reduce the number of slugs in your garden. Dig a hole the size of a glass jar, and bury the jar with the top at ground level. After you have placed the jar in the soil, fill with beer to approximately one inch of the top. The beer helps attract slugs and they end up trapped.

Use untreated stone, brick or wood to build raised beds. If you are to use wood, you should make sure that the wood is not treated and is also naturally rot resistant. Some good choices include locust, cypress, and cedar. Consider the chemicals that will leach out of the wood before choosing anything that has been treated. Remember the affect that such chemicals will have on your plants and soil. If you’re using treated lumber, line it with a barrier, or some plastic.

Annually rotate your garden layout or plan. If you keep planting the same thing in a particular area every year, it can cause a buildup of disease in the soil. Fungus and disease may stay in the soil and then affect your plants the next growing season. By using the crop rotation method, you will be able to ward off disease and fungus naturally.

Look up local botanical insecticides; they can be very useful in keeping the pest population at bay. Natural insecticides are sometimes more effective than the myriad synthetic, chemical-based products available. However, botanical insecticides may not last as long because of their biological makeups, which makes them disappear more quickly.

Stop wasting your money on inferior fruits and vegetables from the supermarket. Implement these tips and starting reaping the benefits of fresh fruits and vegetables.

 
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